DH @ The Library are pleased to announce our exciting Autumn event schedule.
We offer a wide range of workshops and seminars and look forward to welcoming you to any and all.

22 September – Exploring the Digital Humanities
6 October – Requirements Engineering for Digital Humanities Scholarship
17 October – Constructing Narratives Using Digital Objects
14 November – MA Training Spine – Emerging Tools and Trends in the Digital Humanities
28 November – MA Training Spine – Emerging Tools and Trends in the Digital Humanities
12 December – Data Visualisation for the Digital Humanities

Exploring the Digital Humanities

Monday 22 September – McClay Library Training Room 2
11:00 – 15:00

exploringDHThis seminar will explore of exciting trends and initiatives in the digital humanities community of practice. Participants will come away with a appreciation of from where the field has emerged and how it interacts with traditional disciplines in the arts and humanities. This seminar will be of interest to those in traditional humanities disciplines as well as the wider academy as digital humanities is both collaborative and multidisciplinary in practise. Participants will gain greater understanding emerging opportunities in the digital humanities discipline as well as appreciation for DH in Ireland and the UK today.
For more information: Exploring the Digital Humanities
Register: EventBrite

Requirements Engineering for Digital Humanities Scholarship

Monday 6 October – McClay Library Training Auditorium
10:30 – 17:00

requirementsEngineeringAs the field of digital humanities has evolved, one of the biggest challenges has been getting the appropriate technical expertise to make traditional humanities projects successful. At its core this is a communications exercise. However, to communicate effectively involved been able to effectively translate, define and find clarity in your own mind. This workshop is designed to help you clearly delineate your own digital project goals and objectives, account for the various stakeholders (some of which you may be unaware of), document and communicate these effectively to participants outside of your own area of research. Basically, it comes down to finding the means to get the right information, presented in the right manner, to the key people involved in your potential or real digital humanities project. At the end of this workshop participants will be capable of defining their project in simple and more universally appreciated terms, be cognisant of the varied demands that might be placed on the digital project by users, be capable of creating and delivering professional and effective Project Case Documentation.

For more information: Requirements Engineering for Digital Humanities Scholarship
Register: EventBrite

Constructing Narratives Using Digital Objects

Friday 17 October – McClay Library Training Auditorium
11:00 – 16:00

digitalNarrativesWhether for your own use or to make your research outcomes available for a wider audience, increasingly scholarship in the digital humanities involves developing a narrative around collections of digital assets. This workshop will provide participants with a working knowledge of the decisions and choices available to share and disseminate knowledge by collecting and developing narratives around digital objects. During this workshop we will explore a number of possible vehicles that can help you to share your research outcomes including Omeka, Exhibit, TimeMapJS, Neatline, powerful, standards driven tools for managing collections of digitised objects in an interactive and user-driven fashion.
For more information: Constructing Narratives Using Digital Objects
Register: EventBrite

MA Training Spine – Emerging Tools and Trends in the Digital Humanities

Friday 14 November – McClay Library Auditorium
10:15 – 17:00

Digital Humanities is a rapidly growing field of study in which scholarly applications of technology  are used by humanities researchers to perform analyses and generate insights that would be difficult or impossible to achieve without the help of technology. During this mini-module we critically evaluate a range of these technologies focusing on their application to discovery of place,  space, time and context using primary humanities material as data. We will discuss the role of the tool and reflect on how its application is an extension of traditional practices, but which demands appreciation of its implications. Telling stories, for example, is an important part of the knowledge creation process, but in the humanities and social sciences this involves creative unpacking a dissection of raw materials and their re-embodiment into new stories that reflect on the nature and the outcomes of the research process.
More information is available at: <CrawfordLink>

MA Training Spine – Emerging Tools and Trends in the Digital Humanities

Friday 28 November – McClay Library Auditorium
10:15 – 17:00

Digital Humanities is a rapidly growing field of study in which scholarly applications of technology  are used by humanities researchers to perform analyses and generate insights that would be difficult or impossible to achieve without the help of technology. During this mini-module we critically evaluate a range of these technologies focusing on their application to discovery of place,  space, time and context using primary humanities material as data. We will discuss the role of the tool and reflect on how its application is an extension of traditional practices, but which demands appreciation of its implications. Telling stories, for example, is an important part of the knowledge creation process, but in the humanities and social sciences this involves creative unpacking a dissection of raw materials and their re-embodiment into new stories that reflect on the nature and the outcomes of the research process.
More information is available at: <CrawfordLink>

Data Visualisation for the Digital Humanities

Friday 12 December – McClay Library Training Room 2
10:30 – 15:30

datavisforhumanistsData Visualisation skills are of increasing importance in carrying out and presenting humanities scholarship. Participants in this workshop-oriented course will gain and overview of emerging practice through demonstration of a variety of case studies. This workshop will identify a variety of techniques for spatial, textual and relational visualisation of data as a means to identify and explore patterns and trends. It will be of interest to researchers working in both humanities and social science as well as related disciplines. This course will lead into more advanced hands-on workshops in specific aspects of data visualisation. On completion of this workshop attendees will be better suited to evaluate between available tools and to further explore those germane to their research needs.
For more information: Data Visualisation for the Digital Humanities
Register: EventBrite

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